Monthly Archives: September 2017

Using education to foster action: making sustainability relatable for children

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Q&A: JLL’s Emily Scofield

Emily Scofield is the Director of Energy Sustainability Services (ESS) and Health, Safety, Security and Environment (HSSE) for the Bank of America account. She is also the author of a children’s environmental book entitled “CoCo and Dean: Explorers of the World.” The book introduces current environmental issues through the outdoor adventures of siblings, CoCo and Dean.

The concepts of carbon footprint, landfills and ocean plastics can be heavy, but Emily keeps it light-hearted through the siblings’ relatable interactions with nature and one another. She draws readers into the story even more with unique illustrations juxtaposed against photographs of nature. These images allow the reader to creatively imagine the scene depicted in Scofield’s text. The book has been used to reinforce lessons about sustainability in schools and with the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts of America.

Emily Scofield’s love for nature and environmental protection has been present since she was running around the creek bank behind her childhood home and exploring the woods at her grandparent’s farm. As a pre-teen she realized the business opportunity in being sustainable and collected her family’s aluminum cans for recycling money. During the Earth Day revival of 1990, Emily was made aware of global environmental issues that further stoked her passion for the planet. This passion has never waned and Emily’s career path reflects her dedication. Before her children were born, Emily was an adjunct professor at four different colleges in North Carolina, teaching Environmental Science, Issues in Science and other related subjects.

Emily continues to educate others on sustainability through her position at JLL and now through the book, “CoCo and Dean: Explorers of the World”. Emily intends for CoCo and Dean to be the first in a series of adventure tales to elevate children’s eco-awareness. Emily invites you to journey with CoCo and Dean in three short stories as they travel the world to spread the word of environmental responsibility.… Read More

A little sharing leads to big savings for smart buildings

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Smart buildings can be grid partners with utilities by shaving peak loads and increasing resiliency of the grid.

At peak times when utilities face heavy energy loads, smart buildings can shave demand on the grid. Thanks to electronic control systems, sensors, communications and on-site energy storage, buildings can charge their batteries when power is cheap and draw on their stored power during peak hours. Some utilities also give their customers reduced rates if they allow the utility to make momentary, unobtrusive adjustments in electricity loads during peak hours.

Automated demand response agreements enable utilities to remotely switch off their customers’ less critical systems for short periods of time during heavy demand on the grid — for example, turning off power to a hot water heater for five minutes. … Read More

Measurable productivity benefits of enhanced indoor air quality

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Every few years, a groundbreaking study propels our understanding of the impact indoor environments have on employee wellness and productivity. Old-timers will recall one of the first and most famous studies – a lighting retrofit at the Reno, Nevada U.S. Post Office letter-sorting department in 1986, which was merely intended to save energy. An unexpected surprise was that not only did it reduce energy use but the improved quality of lighting also increased the speed of sorting by 10 percent, decreased errors, and achieved a measurable half-million dollars in productivity gains per year.

Since then, our understanding of wellness in the workplace has greatly expanded. Recently, another trailblazing finding has been causing a stir in the wellness industry. It’s a study by the Harvard School of Public Health, which shows a remarkable correlation between carbon dioxide (CO2) levels and productivity.

The experiment consisted of participants playing a computer simulation game in three different office environments in turn: one ‘bad’ environment that had 1,400 parts per million (ppm) of CO2 (such as is often found in offices and schools); another with a moderate level of 945 ppm of CO2 (a typical industry standard); and a third, which had an exceptionally good level of CO2 at 550 ppm. The game was designed to measure nine cognitive functions, including information processing, decision-making and recall.… Read More