Author Archives: JLL

Enhancing employee comfort with the flip of a light switch

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For workplaces that value employee productivity and comfort, color-tunable lighting represents a new frontier. With the ability to cool or warm the light temperature of a room, tunable lighting can wake up or calm down employees, adjust to the time of day and adapt for an after-hours event.

Although nearly all modern workplaces house employees who spend the majority of their days at their computers, most office spaces’ lighting systems were designed for tasks involving paper.

As Simone Skopek and Bob Best of JLL’s Energy and Sustainability Services (ESS) explain in their new book “SMART Green + Productive Workplace,” poor lighting can have a tremendous negative impact on employee productivity. Paper-based tasks require more intense lighting than work done on a computer, and the harsh lighting can cause reflection and glare.… Read More

Coffee: the must-have office perk

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If there is one perk that employees really appreciate it’s free, or even subsidized, coffee. The fact that many workers spend $1,000 or more a year on coffee suggests that the motivation to drink coffee must be very strong. Providing employees with access to coffee in the office — either free or for a modest price — is an easy and inexpensive way to make them feel valued and appreciated. A survey by Green Mountain Coffee found that 37 percent of employees would prefer free or subsidized coffee over an annual office party.

Coffee is a simple pleasure that many people depend on, and which improves productivity. A survey of U.S. workers and their coffee habits conducted by Alterra Coffee Roasters found that:

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Enhancing the human experience: algorithms to drive individual workplace comfort

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When it comes to workplace comfort, researchers at Purdue University are proving the theory that one size doesn’t fit all.

An ongoing study at the Purdue University Center for High Performance Buildings (CHPB), in partnership with JLL, is looking at the effect of customizable indoor environment conditions on employee productivity and satisfaction and building energy consumption. The goal of the two-year project, “Development of self-tuned indoor environments,” is to use measures of individual preferences to come up with smart building technology solutions.

“Essentially we are developing algorithms that can learn occupant preferences accurately and efficiently,” said Associate Professor of Civil Engineering Panagiota Karava, one of the researchers on the project.

Founded in 2013, the CHPB has quickly emerged as a leader in the smart building innovation space. Supported by partnerships with industry leaders, the CHPB takes a multi-disciplinary approach to its research projects, by bringing in experts in mechanical, civil and electrical engineering, as well as specialists in psychology and human behavior.

JLL has partnered with the CHPB on 13 research projects, including this one. The study is collecting data from over 200 participants in private and open-plan offices in an on-campus building that is a living laboratory. Each private office is equipped with dimmable electric lights, motorized shades and a Variable Air Volume system. In one sub-study, sensors measured temperature, light levels and occupant actions as participants were asked to engage in a regular 8-hour workday and interact with the customizable control systems from their desks. … Read More

Using education to foster action: making sustainability relatable for children

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Q&A: JLL’s Emily Scofield

Emily Scofield is the Director of Energy Sustainability Services (ESS) and Health, Safety, Security and Environment (HSSE) for the Bank of America account. She is also the author of a children’s environmental book entitled “CoCo and Dean: Explorers of the World.” The book introduces current environmental issues through the outdoor adventures of siblings, CoCo and Dean.

The concepts of carbon footprint, landfills and ocean plastics can be heavy, but Emily keeps it light-hearted through the siblings’ relatable interactions with nature and one another. She draws readers into the story even more with unique illustrations juxtaposed against photographs of nature. These images allow the reader to creatively imagine the scene depicted in Scofield’s text. The book has been used to reinforce lessons about sustainability in schools and with the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts of America.

Emily Scofield’s love for nature and environmental protection has been present since she was running around the creek bank behind her childhood home and exploring the woods at her grandparent’s farm. As a pre-teen she realized the business opportunity in being sustainable and collected her family’s aluminum cans for recycling money. During the Earth Day revival of 1990, Emily was made aware of global environmental issues that further stoked her passion for the planet. This passion has never waned and Emily’s career path reflects her dedication. Before her children were born, Emily was an adjunct professor at four different colleges in North Carolina, teaching Environmental Science, Issues in Science and other related subjects.

Emily continues to educate others on sustainability through her position at JLL and now through the book, “CoCo and Dean: Explorers of the World”. Emily intends for CoCo and Dean to be the first in a series of adventure tales to elevate children’s eco-awareness. Emily invites you to journey with CoCo and Dean in three short stories as they travel the world to spread the word of environmental responsibility.… Read More

A little sharing leads to big savings for smart buildings

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Smart buildings can be grid partners with utilities by shaving peak loads and increasing resiliency of the grid.

At peak times when utilities face heavy energy loads, smart buildings can shave demand on the grid. Thanks to electronic control systems, sensors, communications and on-site energy storage, buildings can charge their batteries when power is cheap and draw on their stored power during peak hours. Some utilities also give their customers reduced rates if they allow the utility to make momentary, unobtrusive adjustments in electricity loads during peak hours.

Automated demand response agreements enable utilities to remotely switch off their customers’ less critical systems for short periods of time during heavy demand on the grid — for example, turning off power to a hot water heater for five minutes. … Read More