Category Archives: Climate Change

Using education to foster action: making sustainability relatable for children

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Q&A: JLL’s Emily Scofield

Emily Scofield is the Director of Energy Sustainability Services (ESS) and Health, Safety, Security and Environment (HSSE) for the Bank of America account. She is also the author of a children’s environmental book entitled “CoCo and Dean: Explorers of the World.” The book introduces current environmental issues through the outdoor adventures of siblings, CoCo and Dean.

The concepts of carbon footprint, landfills and ocean plastics can be heavy, but Emily keeps it light-hearted through the siblings’ relatable interactions with nature and one another. She draws readers into the story even more with unique illustrations juxtaposed against photographs of nature. These images allow the reader to creatively imagine the scene depicted in Scofield’s text. The book has been used to reinforce lessons about sustainability in schools and with the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts of America.

Emily Scofield’s love for nature and environmental protection has been present since she was running around the creek bank behind her childhood home and exploring the woods at her grandparent’s farm. As a pre-teen she realized the business opportunity in being sustainable and collected her family’s aluminum cans for recycling money. During the Earth Day revival of 1990, Emily was made aware of global environmental issues that further stoked her passion for the planet. This passion has never waned and Emily’s career path reflects her dedication. Before her children were born, Emily was an adjunct professor at four different colleges in North Carolina, teaching Environmental Science, Issues in Science and other related subjects.

Emily continues to educate others on sustainability through her position at JLL and now through the book, “CoCo and Dean: Explorers of the World”. Emily intends for CoCo and Dean to be the first in a series of adventure tales to elevate children’s eco-awareness. Emily invites you to journey with CoCo and Dean in three short stories as they travel the world to spread the word of environmental responsibility.… Read More

Islands: on the front line of climate change

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Covering more than 70 percent of the Earth’s surface, oceans have an intrinsic relationship with weather and climate. Oceans absorb heat from the atmosphere producing winds, currents and storms that bring fresh water to land. Our oceans’ immense capacity to absorb excess heat has helped to mitigate rising global temperatures. But scientific studies show that our oceans are at a tipping point. We are seeing the impacts of global warming on oceans, from rising temperatures and acidity to increasing intensity of storms and flooding. And populations whose survival is dependent on the ocean, such as islands and coastal regions, are experiencing the worst effects of climate change.

Palauan islands are experiencing erosion attributed to mollosks eating away the limestone and the continual push from the tectonic plates beneath. The local community is amazed at the height of the tides and very strongly believe this is a result of climate change.

Palauan islands are experiencing erosion and increased soil salinity attributed to rising sea levels. The local community is amazed at the height of the tides and very strongly believe this is a result of climate change.

Lisa Hinde, Sustainability Manager in JLL’s Energy and Sustainability Services, recently visited the remote island nation of Palau located in the Western Pacific Ocean where climate change has become a daily threat to the country’s survival. As a participant of the Island Innovation Program, Hinde witnessed first-hand the magnitude of the challenge and how governments and businesses are working together to help.

“I see islands like Palau as the ‘canary in the mine’ of global climate change. The effects they feel, being low-lying and prone to tropical storms, show stressors sooner than other places in the world,” Hinde said.… Read More

Science-based targets help private sector fight climate change

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Man-made greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have increased significantly since the Industrial Revolution. If this trend continues, global temperatures are expected to rise between 2 and 6 degrees Celsius by 2100. This change in temperature could unhinge the global climate and cost nearly $2 trillion annually in abatement efforts. In order to avoid the catastrophic impacts of climate change, we must slow down the release of GHG emissions and move towards a low-carbon economy.

ThinkstockPhotos-485873480While world governments have committed to this effort through the United Nations’ COP 21 Paris Climate Agreement, it is only part of the solution. It’s clear that the private sector will need to play a role in overcoming climate change challenges. As a thought leader in this area, JLL works with corporates to assist them in defining and reaching carbon-reduction and other Environmental, Social and Governance targets.

Carbon disclosure

The private sector has experienced increasing pressure to act on climate change. Corporate reporting and disclosures of GHG emissions have made great strides. In addition, companies are setting emissions reduction targets in an effort to mitigate climate change. However, companies often set targets arbitrarily without considering what is realistic and achievable. If we hope to hit global reduction targets, … Read More

Managing real estate is critical to managing climate change

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In  advance of the COP22 conference that was held in Marrakech November 7-18, JLL’s CEO, Christian Ulbrich, shares his thoughts on the important role commercial real estate plays on environmental sustainability in COP 22’s Climate Change: The New Economy. Read the full article here.

Impression

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Climate change, the Paris Agreement and the future of banking and financial services

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JLL’s Dan Probst and Sarah Nicholls joined world leaders and experts from the private and public sectors at the United Nations climate conference – known as COP21 – in Paris in December, and blogged about their experiences here. Below, Sarah discusses the COP21 outcome – known as the Paris Agreement – and what it means for the banking and financial services industries.

It’s easy to understand the basic premise of the Paris Agreement: 195 nations have committed to limit global temperatures from rising above 2 degrees Celsius relative to pre-industrial levels. But determining what the Paris Agreement means for your business is more complex – especially in the banking and financial services industries.

Luckily, we’ve broken down the key points for you:… Read More