Tag Archives: Carbon reporting

Voluntary carbon reporting: Why bother?

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There are five main platforms to report carbon. Which one is right for your organization?

The geopolitical and economic fall-out of climate change is prompting the world’s largest investors to decarbonize their portfolios. To do this, they need to know how the companies they invest in are addressing climate change risks.

Reporting quantitative data on sustainability and carbon emissions can be challenging for a complex organization. The fact that many companies do it voluntarily is because this data is becoming increasingly more important to remain attractive to investors who must protect their portfolios against environmental risks.

The trend of voluntary disclosure has resulted in a proliferation of carbon reporting platforms, including the CDP (formerly the Carbon Disclosure Project), the Global Reporting Index, GRESB, GreenPrint and the Dow Jones Sustainability Index.

These carbon reporting platforms vary in focus, so it’s important to choose the right one for your organization. Some address a broad range of corporate social responsibility issues and business operations; others focus more narrowly on just carbon emissions or the environment; while yet others focus on specific sectors, such as the buildings sector.… Read More

Mandatory disclosure programs (and why they work)

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As cities expand and multiply, their citizens and infrastructure are greatly affected by the environmental risks and associated costs of climate change. For this reason, many cities and some states are requiring that the energy performance and/or carbon emissions of buildings be disclosed. These mandatory disclosure programs have been so successful in reducing carbon emissions that a growing number of states, counties and cities are now adopting them.

How mandatory disclosure programs operate

Typically, these programs require annual disclosure for commercial and sometimes multi-residential buildings over a certain size. In New York City, for example, the policy applies to buildings over 50,000 square feet. These buildings constitute only 2 percent of New York City’s buildings, but account for 50 percent of the total floor area of commercial buildings. The relatively small number of buildings makes the program manageable, while the large floor area that they represent can make a significant impact. Many U.S. cities have set ambitious goals. Portland, Ore. set a goal of cutting carbon emissions by 80 percent by 2050. Atlanta projects that its ordinance will drive a 20-percent reduction in energy consumption by 2030.… Read More

Where are markets lagging behind in sustainability transparency?

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JLL’s 2016 Real Estate Environmental Sustainability Transparency Index analyses sustainability transparency in real estate for 37 markets across the globe. The index identifies those markets that are leading the charge for sustainability, as well as those markets that are lagging behind, based on analysis of seven environmental sustainability indicators. Read on to learn where the greatest opportunities to improve sustainability transparency lie.

The 2016 Sustainability Transparency Index suggests that minimum energy efficiency standards and green building certification programs continue to be the most widespread environmental transparency instruments. But where are the biggest gaps – and areas for improvement?

Financial indicators remain few and far between

Sustainability transparencyOf the 37 markets analysed, only four countries – France, Canada, New Zealand and Australia – have established financial performance indicators for green buildings.

As a result, there is a considerable gap for most major real estate markets to assess the relative performance of more environmentally-friendly real estate assets. Calculating performance of sustainably-designed and operated assets, for example, is practically impossible without a framework to establish appropriate financial benchmarks and performance targets.… Read More