Tag Archives: employee productivity

Enhancing employee comfort with the flip of a light switch

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For workplaces that value employee productivity and comfort, color-tunable lighting represents a new frontier. With the ability to cool or warm the light temperature of a room, tunable lighting can wake up or calm down employees, adjust to the time of day and adapt for an after-hours event.

Although nearly all modern workplaces house employees who spend the majority of their days at their computers, most office spaces’ lighting systems were designed for tasks involving paper.

As Simone Skopek and Bob Best of JLL’s Energy and Sustainability Services (ESS) explain in their new book “SMART Green + Productive Workplace,” poor lighting can have a tremendous negative impact on employee productivity. Paper-based tasks require more intense lighting than work done on a computer, and the harsh lighting can cause reflection and glare.… Read More

Enhancing the human experience: algorithms to drive individual workplace comfort

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When it comes to workplace comfort, researchers at Purdue University are proving the theory that one size doesn’t fit all.

An ongoing study at the Purdue University Center for High Performance Buildings (CHPB), in partnership with JLL, is looking at the effect of customizable indoor environment conditions on employee productivity and satisfaction and building energy consumption. The goal of the two-year project, “Development of self-tuned indoor environments,” is to use measures of individual preferences to come up with smart building technology solutions.

“Essentially we are developing algorithms that can learn occupant preferences accurately and efficiently,” said Associate Professor of Civil Engineering Panagiota Karava, one of the researchers on the project.

Founded in 2013, the CHPB has quickly emerged as a leader in the smart building innovation space. Supported by partnerships with industry leaders, the CHPB takes a multi-disciplinary approach to its research projects, by bringing in experts in mechanical, civil and electrical engineering, as well as specialists in psychology and human behavior.

JLL has partnered with the CHPB on 13 research projects, including this one. The study is collecting data from over 200 participants in private and open-plan offices in an on-campus building that is a living laboratory. Each private office is equipped with dimmable electric lights, motorized shades and a Variable Air Volume system. In one sub-study, sensors measured temperature, light levels and occupant actions as participants were asked to engage in a regular 8-hour workday and interact with the customizable control systems from their desks. … Read More

Measurable productivity benefits of enhanced indoor air quality

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Every few years, a groundbreaking study propels our understanding of the impact indoor environments have on employee wellness and productivity. Old-timers will recall one of the first and most famous studies – a lighting retrofit at the Reno, Nevada U.S. Post Office letter-sorting department in 1986, which was merely intended to save energy. An unexpected surprise was that not only did it reduce energy use but the improved quality of lighting also increased the speed of sorting by 10 percent, decreased errors, and achieved a measurable half-million dollars in productivity gains per year.

Since then, our understanding of wellness in the workplace has greatly expanded. Recently, another trailblazing finding has been causing a stir in the wellness industry. It’s a study by the Harvard School of Public Health, which shows a remarkable correlation between carbon dioxide (CO2) levels and productivity.

The experiment consisted of participants playing a computer simulation game in three different office environments in turn: one ‘bad’ environment that had 1,400 parts per million (ppm) of CO2 (such as is often found in offices and schools); another with a moderate level of 945 ppm of CO2 (a typical industry standard); and a third, which had an exceptionally good level of CO2 at 550 ppm. The game was designed to measure nine cognitive functions, including information processing, decision-making and recall.… Read More

People first: green design for health, wellness and productivity

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JLL’s Lower Manhattan office at 28 Liberty Street achieved WELL Certification at the Silver level, a measure of the company’s commitment to employee health, well-being and productivity. The new space was designed to showcase the firm’s dedication to sustainability, energy efficiency, return on investment, and health and wellness, and also meets the U.S. Green Building Council standards for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold Certification.

“JLL’s new office in Lower Manhattan demonstrates the firm’s strong commitment to supporting human health, well-being and comfort in commercial buildings,” said Dana Schneider, Managing Director and Head of JLL’s Energy Sustainability Services group in the Northeast. “There is no better way to understand the impact of incorporating human health advocacy into everyday real estate decisions than to do it ourselves for our own staff.”

The WELL Building Standard, a performance-based certification system, evaluates seven categories of building performance: air, water, light, nourishment, fitness, comfort and mind. WELL is grounded in a body of evidence-based research that explores the connection between the buildings where we spend approximately 90 percent of our time and the health and wellness impacts on us as occupants of these buildings. To be awarded WELL Certification, JLL’s office underwent rigorous testing and a final third-party evaluation to ensure it met all WELL Certified Silver performance requirements.… Read More

Engaged Employees Pay Out

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Bob BestPosted by:
Bob Best
Energy & Sustainability Services

Why bother with programs that get employees more “engaged?” After all, isn’t just a lot babble?

Some interesting research indicates that it’s not babble at all.

  • Engaged employees at Molson Coors were five time less likely to have a safety incident, and seven times less likely to have a lost-time safety incident.
  • Engaged employees in the U.K. take
  • Read More